NINA-W1(32) usage in a network stack

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Hi
I am looking into using NINA-W132 for network/wifi access in a project, but I am left a bit wondering on how exactly to use it.
Originally the idea was we could use this as a sort of lowest level layer for LWIP like you would do with a cpu network pheripheral for wired connections, but after reading the available documentation it is clear it does not work that way (when using the AT interface).

From what I understand now, this might provide a super limited (only 7 'connections' (=peers) max, and for listening only max 1 port for TCP and max 1 port for UDP) replacement for the "native" level of lwip.
Or alternatively you could create your own proprietary "socket" glue layer on top of this (redoing the work that lwip does in the sequential netconn/socket layers).

So is there anyone who can give an example of how they used this chip in a project ?
Did you combine it with lwip/... or something proprietary ?
Did you use the normal data mode or the extended data mode (the normal data mode seems almost useless unless you have only one connection/peer?)
Are there libs available somewhere for taking care of the wrapping/unwrapping of the extended data mode format ?

( Sorry if these are already taken care of somewhere, but searching the forum did not give me many hits on NINA-W1)

Thanks,
Bram
by BramPeeters asked Mar 12
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Isn't NINA-W1 taking care of all low level negotiations, etc.  It's like a Wi-Fi hot spot and as such max number of connections is limited.  You may need more than one NINA if you need more than 7 connections.
by grumpy answered Apr 3
Yes that is with I mean with 'replacement for the "native" level of lwip.'
But it seems you still need a lot of extra code to have something that you can start using in a project.
(At the moment we have put this on hold and are looking into something that should allow for faster integration...)
Not sure I agree with your assessment as NINA-W1 should take care of all low level stuff.  But than again it may be specific to your project.